Memphis Settlements: New Process and a Satellite Location

By Chief Judge Kenneth M. Switzer, Nashville Memphis, Nashville, and Murfreesboro conduct the most settlement approvals in Tennessee. Memphis has presented difficulties for some time now with providing enough settlement times to accommodate the large volume. The location and accessibility of the Memphis office unfortunately complicate the matter. We’ve long heard stories of difficulty finding … Continue reading Memphis Settlements: New Process and a Satellite Location

Board Determines the Court’s Discretion with Requests for Admissions

By Janaye Godfrey, Court Intern, Nashville Belmont University College of Law ‘24 The Appeals Board released an opinion last week determining the scope of a trial court’s discretion when applying Rule 36 of the Tennessee Rules of Civil Procedure, which governs requests for admissions. In Holt v. Quality Floor Coverings, LLC, the employee alleged an … Continue reading Board Determines the Court’s Discretion with Requests for Admissions

Board Considers Noncompliance, Letters to Experts

By Jane Salem, staff attorney, Nashville The Appeals Board released an opinion yesterday, reiterating the fairly well-settled parameters of medical noncompliance in the Workers’ Compensation Law. The decision also held that trial judges have an obligation to scrutinize letters seeking expert opinions for their accuracy regarding the facts and law.  In Marie Bailey v. Amazon, … Continue reading Board Considers Noncompliance, Letters to Experts

Discovering the Better Angels of our Nature: A Brief Look at Discovery Motions

By Judge Allen Phillips, Jackson Some may recall that I admire the wisdom of Abraham Lincoln. I cited some of that wisdom in an earlier post regarding attorney’s fees. Beyond fees, Lincoln’s visionary insights into other matters ring as true today as they did nine score and six years ago (That was 1836, the year … Continue reading Discovering the Better Angels of our Nature: A Brief Look at Discovery Motions

Templates Revised for Disputed Cases: No Doubt

By Judge Lisa A. Lowe, Knoxville We use certain words to mean certain things. Sometimes we use a word or phrase out of habit, without really thinking of the meaning or implication. For example, those involved in Tennessee workers’ compensation cases are familiar with what we have called “doubtful and disputed” settlements. “Doubtful” means uncertainty … Continue reading Templates Revised for Disputed Cases: No Doubt

Gerichtshof verabschiedet AuslegungsprotokollGerichtshof nimmt Auslegung an

Von Chief Judge Kenneth M. Switzer, Nashville Im vergangenen November veröffentlichten wir einen Artikel über die Bedeutung der richtigen Interpretation während der Gerichtsverhandlungen – nicht nur Vergleiche, sondern auch beschleunigte Anhörungen und Entschädigungsanhörungen. Zuvor haben wir einige hybride Interpretationen zugelassen. Wir haben Konversationsdolmetschen, Simultanübersetzungen und geteilte Dolmetschungen erlaubt (bei denen der Mitarbeiter teilweise seine Sprache … Continue reading Gerichtshof verabschiedet AuslegungsprotokollGerichtshof nimmt Auslegung an

Remember to Set Approvals at Remote Locations

By Chief Judge Kenneth M. Switzer, Nashville A quick reminder that the Court returns to in-person settlements this week across the state at our regional courtrooms. In addition, we remind of the following remote locations, with dates and contact information. Judge Addington: Hamblen County, first Wednesday each month from 9 a.m. Eastern Time to noon … Continue reading Remember to Set Approvals at Remote Locations

Board Reverses in Love versus Love Management

By Sarah Byrne, staff attorney, Nashville Recently, the Appeals Board issued its opinion in Love v. Love Management, Inc., reversing the trial court for applying incorrect legal standards when it denied the insurer a continuance and granted partial summary judgment to Mrs. Love. Because it bears repeating, Presiding Judge Timothy Conner wrote a concurring opinion … Continue reading Board Reverses in Love versus Love Management

Direct and Natural Consequences Rule Remains Intact

By Jane Salem, staff attorney, Nashville The Tennessee Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board ruled earlier this week that the Reform Act of 2013 didn’t affect the longstanding “direct and natural consequences rule” for causation. The Board additionally held that the trial court correctly admitted a vocational expert’s testimony into evidence, despite the fact that he destroyed … Continue reading Direct and Natural Consequences Rule Remains Intact